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View Full Version : SuperDuper! fails to mount backup image


edoates
11-22-2005, 12:50 PM
Since upgrading to 10.4.3, it seems that mounting sparse images takes longer than SuperDuper! is willing to wait. Whether I run from a script or just start up SuperDuper! to use its last saved settings, much of the time I get the SD message that it cannot mount the image; then, a couple of seconds later the image appears on the desktop. If I'm running manually, this is only an annoyance; if I'm running from a script (using Cronnix to schedule it), SD seems to fail with an OS-X application crash.

Has anyone else seen this? Is it just a matter of the internal SD timeout for mounting being made longer?

FYI: the sparse images I'm mounting are 150GB in size on a never-sleeping (use Spindown fix) Firewire drive. If I mount it directly from Finder, it takes about 6 seconds to mount (that is, just double clicking on it).

Suggestions?

Ed

dnanian
11-22-2005, 12:52 PM
Hold out until tomorrow, Ed. ;)

edoates
11-22-2005, 02:26 PM
Will, do. It is interesting that my wife's iMac G5 SD backup fails as noted, but my G5 2.5DP does not, though in both cases, the sparse image mount takes significantly longer than it did under 10.4.2, or so it seems. As I recall, double clicking on the SI to mount it took just a second or so, now 4 or more seconds with much gnashing of the disk drive's "teeth" (i.e. lots of seeks going on).

Ed

dnanian
11-22-2005, 03:31 PM
That's really pretty strange, because we actually don't do the mount "ourselves". Rather, the Alias Manager does it!

edoates
11-22-2005, 03:50 PM
It's a generic strange-ness, since just double clicking on the sparse image file to mount it from finder behaves identically. It mounts OK, just takes significantly longer than it used to.

I wait a day (as you suggested :) ) and see if SD has a longer timeout for the mount. I assume you have a time out which is exceeded and that's why it fails when run from a script.

Ed

dnanian
11-22-2005, 03:51 PM
You might also want to use Disk Utility to repair the volume stored in the image, Ed.