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tasha edwards
07-01-2008, 10:33 AM
Hi Dave,

I'm confused about something you said... some examples follow:

1: "You can keep this on its own volume, or you can even store and Smart Update it alongside your Time Machine backups."

2: "2.5 is fully compatible with Leopard, and produces fully bootable backups of the newest version of OS X."

3: "How do I store a bootable backup side-by-side with my Time Machine data?
It's actually really simple. Assuming the Time Machine volume is properly partitioned and formatted for the Mac (as "GUID" for Intel Macs"

4: "t's a good idea to turn Time Machine off before trying to copy a Time Machine volume. Also, make sure that your destination volume has Journaling turned on (it should be formatted as "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)", since Time Machine requires it."

My question:
Can a hard drive be partitioned with "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)", since Time Machine requires it." in one partition and "GUID" on the other?

If so I would see how you could store a bootable backup side-by-side with my Time Machine data because as you said "(it should be formatted as "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)", since Time Machine requires it." but Leopard requires "GUID" I'm confused about this.

I just moved to imac/leopard and with two Glyph external drives, one 250 gig for Time Machine and one 500 gig to be partitioned for one bootable copy of my main drive and one sandbox and one partition for a copy of time machine. I know 3 partitions sounds like a lot but I'm only backing up 50 gig so I should be ok for a while but this would mean two partitions in GUID to run from (I don't want to run from my main drive ever) and one partition ("Mac OS Extended (Journaled)", since Time Machine requires it.")

If this is crazy, how would I go about it? It's the statements "store and Smart Update it alongside your Time Machine backups" that has me confused.

p.s. I have the latest version of SD

Thanks in advance

Wayne

dnanian
07-01-2008, 11:35 AM
GUID is a partition scheme, not a volume format. The drive would be partitioned into volumes using the GUID scheme. Each volume would be formatted as Mac OS Extended (Jouraled).

tasha edwards
07-01-2008, 02:35 PM
Thank you Dave, it's almost clear ;-)
I suppose I would formate the drive then do
the partitions with GUID but what if you don't partition?
After formate there must be something to do with GUID?

Sorry but this is all new to me and thanks for the very
quick reply.

Wayne

dnanian
07-01-2008, 03:26 PM
A drive, in general, is partitioned even if there's only one partition...

tasha edwards
07-01-2008, 04:14 PM
I appreciate you help.

All the best

Wayne