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mreed
07-10-2006, 05:29 PM
I've read the manual regarding restoring, and I understand what to do, but,not having the experience of restoring from a backup, the question I have is: What will happen when you restore using the backup in Disk Utility?
If I need to restore from backup, do I clean install Tiger and then restore?
Do I erase and zero data and restore?
OR do I erase and zero, then clean install, then update to current version and THEN run backup?
OR something else all toghter different?
Considering this is the first full backup I've done since I've owned a computer, ( Retrospect is just too confusing for an "average" user...), I don't think the question is out of line.

dnanian
07-10-2006, 05:44 PM
No one is suggesting your question is "out of line"! :)

If you use Disk Utility, you'll use it to erase the drive, then copy from the backup to the drive (there's a checkbox in the Restore tab that erases). There's no need to install anything, since it's all on the backup itself.

Of course, an alternative would be to clean install Tiger, then -- when it prompts during first boot -- use the Migration Assistant to migrate your files and applications from the backup. You'd then use Software Update to get back to whatever version of Tiger you were running.

Hope that helps.

mreed
07-11-2006, 09:18 AM
Thanks for responding Dave. This is more than a hypothetical question to me. I administer my father's system, (17" iMac PPC), and from the beginning I've suspected a hardware problem that Apple tech. says was software related. My plan is to follow your instructions with and erase and restore and see what happens. If his issues remain I'll return to Apple and insist on logic board replacement.
Is it possible, if it is software, that the offending file is restored and the problem remains or should the erase and restore 'fix' things?

dnanian
07-11-2006, 09:49 AM
Just copying the same install back probably isn't going to help. I'd suggest doing the clean install of Tiger, followed by the migration.

Or, even less radically, archive-and-install OSX on the original drive, which will put a new OS under what you've got, and move the existing one aside.

But don't format-and-restore unless there's a really good reason to do so.