launchTunes

Ocean of words Thursday, May 03, 2007

For those who haven't heard me blather at length about all things SuperDuper! and Shirt Pocket, there's a 45 minute interview of me up at MacVoices.

Remember: the game rules require you to drink every time you hear me say "Um", "Uh" or audibly gesticulate. Do not play while driving.

New netTunes and launchTunes! Wednesday, August 23, 2006

Shirt Pocket releases netTunes 2.3 and launchTunes 1.1
The Macworld Eddy Award Winning “No Compromises” iTunes Remote - now Universal!

Weston, MA – August 23, 2006:  Shirt Pocket announces the immediate availability of netTunes 2.3, the latest update to the Macworld Eddy Award winning remote control for iTunes, and the perfect companion to Apple’s AirPort Express and launchTunes 1.1, the application that guarantees your shared iTunes libraries are available without all that pesky walking.

netTunes lets you control iTunes running on one Macintosh from another, using iTunes’ native interface. You get the same window, the same playlists, the same capabilities. You simply run netTunes and take complete control of the “remote” iTunes from any Macintosh in your house. It’s that easy — as easy as iTunes itself!

“It’s been a long time coming, but the new versions of netTunes and launchTunes are ready to go” says David Nanian, the founder of Shirt Pocket. “But we didn’t just recompile—we’ve taken advantage of both the Intel and Power PC platforms by improving performance across the board, and polished the user experience as well.”

netTunes and launchTunes are available for immediate download at the Shirt Pocket web site http://www.shirt-pocket.com. Users can evaluate all of the capabilities of netTunes for free for 30 minutes at a time; full licenses cost $19.95, and can be ordered at the Shirt Pocket web site, or directly from the application. launchTunes costs $7, and the Tune Suite—a bundle of netTunes and launchTunes—is offered at $23.95 - a $3 savings.

About Shirt Pocket
Shirt Pocket, based in Weston, Massachusetts, was formed in late 2000 as a Macintosh-only shareware creator and publisher. Shirt Pocket’s first product, the Eddy award winning netTunes, lets users control iTunes on one Mac from any other Mac on the network with iTunes own intuitive user interface. launchTunes, Shirt Pocket’s second product, made iTunes’ playlist sharing practical by automatically launching iTunes on remote servers when needed. And its third, the Eddy award winning SuperDuper!, is one of the most highly acclaimed backup/cloning programs available for the Mac. All are available from the Shirt Pocket web site at http://www.shirt-pocket.com.

Shirt Pocket was started by David Nanian, co-founder of UnderWare, Inc, and one of the original authors of the BRIEF programmer’s editor and Track Record bug tracking system.

Taiko Monday, August 21, 2006

A few quick pictures of Taiko as I prepare for the rollout of the new netTunes and launchTunes this week…

Young Taiko
Taiko Sleeping
Taiko on Rug - 11 Weeks

Waiting… Sunday, July 30, 2006

OK! The testing of netTunes and launchTunes, its purchasing process, Universal Support and integrated store is complete. Things are basically ready to go, except for one thing—I’m waiting for a new version of the eSellerate Integrated Web Store library to be released.

This was supposed to go sometime a week or two ago, but unfortunately got delayed. It’s important, though, because the store installation procedure leaves a file in /tmp that, for some reason, Tiger feels is necessary to move into “Recovered Items” in your trash.

They’ve been working on a fix for that, and I’ve been waiting for that fix to become available. Any day now, I’m told, and I’m passing that savings on to you!

What’s taking so long? Thursday, July 06, 2006

It’s been difficult, these last few months, to find the time necessary to work on netTunes and launchTunes while working on/supporting SuperDuper! and navigating the waters of decline with Ketzl.

netTunes was pretty much done back in April, save for some online store issues—I want to support PayPal, and that means moving to the new “Embedded Web Store” (which is also required for Universal apps). Doing that involves doing some new graphics/layout for the custom pages.

launchTunes, though, was harder—ironic, since it’s a much simpler program. The big problem was that launchTunes hadn’t yet been converted to a drag-and-drop install, and I’d done some work extending its capabilities that hadn’t been completed.

Plus, I’d learned more about Cocoa in the few years since its original release (it’s never been updated)… so, it was time to throw out the old and rewrite the whole thing. Which, given the time constraints, took longer in calendar time than anticipated.

I’m happy to say that I managed to finish up the main launchTunes application, with its auto-install capabilities, while flying back from Chicago the other day. Everything tested out great, so now I’m working on the two apps’ graphics and online store stuff.

Once that’s done, the Universal versions of netTunes and launchTunes will finally get into your hands. Sorry it’s taken so long!

Hoarse-ing around Thursday, May 04, 2006

Despite being down and mostly out with a cold/flu, I’ll be appearing on The Tech Night Owl LIVE tonight, May 4th, talking about SuperDuper!, netTunes, launchTunes, and desperately trying to not cough up a chunk of lung.

You can tune into the broadcast from 6:00 to 8:00 PM Pacific, 9:00 to 11:00 PM Eastern, at http://www.techbroadcasting.com. An archive of the show will be available for downloading and listening within four hours after the original broadcast.

You can also access the show’s Podcast feed, available at: http://www.techbroadcasting.com/nightowl.xml.

Going Universal Wednesday, February 01, 2006

Our “production” iMac hit the Shirt Pocket loading dock (aka my front step) yesterday, and I’ve been busily working on updates to netTunes and launchTunes while Bruce works on completing the next update to SuperDuper!, which looks like it will be Universal as well.†

It’s been nice to get back to Xcode after some time off (my design/marketing/documentation/support/etc duties keep me away from it more than I’d like), and it didn’t take more than a few hours to do the netTunes conversion—it’s up and running as I type, and works great.

The big challenge with netTunes was the screen “scraping”—the code has some byte-order dependencies because of pixels, and I wasn’t looking forward to re-writing the “inner loop” to handle all the various cases with Thousands and Millions of colors using both MMX and Altivec. Blegh.

Fortunately, there was an elegant solution. Since the Intel Mac is Tiger-only, I was able to make use of some the new Accelerate framework APIs to eliminate byte order dependencies and—at least under Tiger—about two pages of nasty code. Since the Intel Macs can’t run Panther, I didn’t have to change the already-working parts. The result? Both the Intel and PPC versions benefit, at least under 10.4.

It’s always a good feeling when you can delete code and leave the hardware-specific optimization up to the guys who live and breathe vector processing units, let me tell you.

Anyway, we’re working hard to get the Universal binaries out the door. Obviously, it’s important to do extensive testing using real, production hardware—and we’re doing just that.

† - Updated for the exclamation point haters. You know who you are.

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