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View Full Version : Suggestions for first usage of SD


cmeinck
06-07-2005, 09:20 AM
I'm planning on ordering SD. Before I use it, I'd like to develop a strategy for the best backup/use of my equipment. I've got an 80GB Powerbook and my wife has a 60GB Powerbook. Chances are that she'll never pass 20GB of files. I however am the power user of the family. My plan is to work pretty much exclusively off of a 250GB Firewire 800 drive. This will also be the drive that I do my backups. All of my MP3's and photos are sitting on my old desktop and I need to find a place for those. I'm not as concerned with carrying all of my MP3's on my Powerbook, because I have my iPod. My thought is to add them somewhere on the Firewire drive and let iTunes know where they are..

My initial ideas is to create 3 partitions:
1 - My Powerbook Backup (which will be mainly the OS and the App's) and a few files that I'm currently working on
2 - All of my files, MP3's, photos, documents
3 - My wife's Powerbook partition ( which will be her entire drive including OS and files)

Here are my questions:
Should I partition the FW drive? What is the best strategy and practice for backing up my files? What files should I keep on my PB if any? If I leave all my files on the FW drive, then am I really "backuping up". I'm leaving myself open to the FW drive failing. I still have a Desktop Mac that I'm using also as a FW drive. Can I use SD to copy #2 (all of my files) to the Desktop Mac's hard drive?

Sorry for the rambling and all the questions. I just want to be sure I set everything up correctly.

Thanks.
Chris

dnanian
06-07-2005, 09:50 AM
First off, you're right in one of your questions: I think it's a mistake to put a backup on the same physical device as your data. In the event of a hardware failure -- the most likely catastrophic failure will be your drive -- you'll have no way to recover. This is a big mistake.

So, if you want to keep your data on a FireWire drive, you should have a separate FireWire drive for your backups.

I'd then suggest partitioning the backup appropriately to give each backed up source volume its own destination volume.

I'd really boot from your PowerBook and -- if you must -- use one (data only) drive for storage, but always boot from the PowerBook. Then, have a second drive onto which you place the various backups.

cmeinck
06-07-2005, 01:28 PM
How about this as a strategy:
- Keep my Powerbook clean (OS, Applications)
- Pick up a small, portable 80GB or so FW drive that contains my "everyday" files (MP3's, Current works in progress, etc). Connect to the Powerbook when doing my work. The portability will allow me to travel with the drive.
- Partition the 250GB FW800 into 3 partitions



Powerbook 15" (contains OS and App's)
Portable Firewire Drive with all my data (MP3's, Works in Progress, Documents)
My wifes 12" Powerbook (OS, All of her files)


Thanks for your help. If this sounds crazy or if you have a better suggestion -- please let me know.

dnanian
06-07-2005, 06:01 PM
I think that'll work fine.

drkrathw
11-07-2005, 11:06 PM
I think that'll work fine.

I'm a newbie that has a similar problem with some complications. I have an early G-4 .400 mh 10 Gb desktop. I keep it because it has applications I still want to run that don't seem to work properly in Classic, so it still runs OS 9.2.2. I also have a G-4 powerbook with 40 Gb hard drive of the same speed and a new 1.67 Gh powerbook with an 80 Gb hard drive running Panther. I want to use the 40 Gb G-4 as hard drive storage and clone both the others onto it. Presumably I'd put Panther on 40 Gb (I plan to upgrade the 80 Gb to Tiger once it is cloned). But that raises the question of whether I could use SD to clone the desktop with OS 9 in the same volume as the clone of the faster G-4 that runs Panther. Or would I have to partition the 40 GB to 10 and 30 Gb volumes. If so what OS would I put on the 10 to use SD? Or should I get another software to clone it that handles OS 9?

Thanks very much for the help!!!

drkrathw

dnanian
11-08-2005, 08:43 AM
I think, in this situation, you'd be better off -- for the desktop -- to get OS9-specific software, since you're maintaining an OS9 environment there.

It really also sounds like you should invest in an external drive, rather than trying to use one machine as "storage" for the others. A FireWire drive can be had for around $100 these days, $150 for about 250GB (see this post (http://www.shirt-pocket.com/blog/index.php/shadedgrey/comments/the_ninety_nine_per_cent_solution/) for some links).